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  • About OVL
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ONGC Videsh Limited - Working globally for the energy security of India

Introduction
ONGC Videsh, a Miniratna Schedule “A” Central Public Sector Enterprise (CPSE) of the Government of India under the administrative control of the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas is the wholly owned subsidiary and overseas arm of Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC), the flagship national oil company (NOC) of India. The primary business of ONGC Videsh is to prospect for oil and gas acreages outside India, including exploration, development and production of oil and gas.

ONGC Videsh was incorporated as Hydrocarbons India Pvt. Ltd. on 5 March 1965 to carry out exploration and development of the Rostam and Raksh oil fields in Iran and undertaking a service contract in Iraq. The company was rechristened as ONGC Videsh Limited on 15th June, 1989 with the prime objective of marketing the expertise of ONGC abroad. The nineties saw the Company engaged in limited exploration activities in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia and Vietnam.

In its new avatar as ONGC Videsh, the company from mid-nineties re-oriented its focus on acquiring quality overseas oil and gas assets. ONGC Videsh, which had one asset in year 2000, gradually succeeded in competing with the best in the international arena and could conclude many large transactions across the world in subsequent years. Presently, ONGC Videsh owns Participating Interests in 33 oil and gas assets in 16 countries and contributes to 14.5% and 8% of oil and natural gas production of India respectively. In terms of reserves and production, ONGC Videsh is the second largest petroleum Company of India, next only to its parent ONGC.
  
ONGC Videsh’s oil and gas operations produced 8.36 MMT of oil and oil equivalent gas in 2013-14 as against 0.252 MMT of O+OEG in 2002-03. ONGC Videsh’s overseas cumulative investment up to 31st March, 2014 has crossed USD 22 billion.

Current Assets Portfolio
ONGC Videsh has stake in 33 oil and gas projects in 16 Countries. ONGC Videsh adopts a balanced portfolio approach and maintains a combination of producing, discovered, exploration assets and pipeline assets. ONGC Videsh has 13 producing assets, namely, Russia (Sakhalin-I and Imperial Energy), Syria (Al-Furat Petroleum Co.), Vietnam (Block 06.1), Colombia (MECL), Sudan (Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company), South Sudan (Greater Pioneer Operating Company and Sudd Petroleum Operating Company), Venezuela (San Cristobal), Brazil (BC-10), Myanmar (Block A1 & Block A3) and Azerbaijan (ACG). 4 Assets where hydrocarbons have been discovered are at various stages of development, 14 assets are under various stages of exploration phase and 2 pipeline projects are under operation for transportation of oil and gas.

ONGC Videsh made successfully new acquisitions in last one and half year by investing more than USD 4 billion which include (a) acquisition of Hess Corporation’s 2.7213% participating interest in the Azeri, Chirag and the Deep Water Portion of Guneshli Fields in the Azerbaijan sector of the Caspian Sea (“ACG”) and 2.36% interest in the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (“BTC”) Pipeline which was completed in March 2013, ACG is one of the world’s biggest oil producing field in Caspian Sea; (b) acquisition of an additional 12% PI in Block BC-10, a deep-water offshore block in Campos Basin, Brazil  in December, 2013; (c) acquisition of 6% PI in the Rovuma Area 1 Offshore Block in Mozambique from Videocon in January, 2014; (d) acquisition of  a direct 10% PI in the same Rovuma Area 1 from Anadarko in February, 2014. Apart from these, ONGC Videsh acquired two shallow water blocks in Bangladesh namely SS-04 and SS-09 in 50-50 consortium with Oil India Limited. ONGC Videsh has also been awarded two onshore blocks namely B2 (Zebyutaung-Nandaw) and EP-3 (Thegon-Shwegu) in the Myanmar Onshore Bidding Round 2013.

Fulfilling social responsibility as a corporate citizen is part of the foundational ethos of Indian Public Sector Enterprises. ONGC Videsh operates as responsible global corporate citizen by positively engaging with the communities and society where it operates. ONGC Videsh is committed to create a positive and lasting social impact by developing successful partnerships built on mutual trust and respect, ultimately raising the standard of living and the stability of the communities of the countries in which the Company operates. ONGC Videsh makes valuable contribution in many ways e.g. through payment of tax revenues to governments; by investing in education and training and improving employment opportunities for nationals; providing medical/sports/agricultural facilities to the local community etc.

ONGC Videsh operates in highly competitive international oil and gas sector by competing with the best in the industry. Over the years, ONGC Videsh has built inherent capabilities and expertise in its areas of operations. ONGC Videsh has developed strong partnership alliance with a host of IOCs and NOCs including ExxonMobil, British Petroleum, Shell, ENI, Total, Repsol, Statoil, Chevron, Petrobras, Sodeco, Socar, Rosneft, Daewoo, Kazmunaigaz (KMG), Petro Vietnam, CNPC, Sinopec, PDVSA, Petronas, Anadarko and Ecopetrol. It has highly skilled human resource with excellent technical and management capabilities. The company has built facilities for evaluation, interpretation, economic modeling, FEED, design and execution of oil and gas projects and enjoys the technical and human resource support from ONGC. ONGC Videsh has developed core expertise in due diligence, techno-commercial evaluations, bid negotiations and transaction documentations.

ONGC Videsh is focused to support India’s oil and gas security through overseas participation in oil and gas Exploration and Production activities. The emerging industry landscape augurs well for the company as it evolves into a leading New Multinational Oil Company (NMOC). As a NMOC, the company is positioning itself to be a key ONGC growth vehicle by aiming for 60MMTOE production by 2030.

ONGC Videsh has emerged as India’s most internationalized company based on the Trans nationality Index (TNI) as per survey conducted jointly by Indian school of Business (ISB), Hyderabad and Fundacao Dom Cabral (FDC), Brazil.

 

Our Vision

To be a world-class exploration and production company providing energy security oil to the country.


Our Objectives
  • To support India's energy security
  • To build balanced portfolio of exploration, discovered and producing assets in focus countries
  • To build a team that excels in performance through assimilation of best practices and technologies
  • To be at par with the best international oil and gas companies
  • Be the strongest Indian Player in the international E&P
  • Build collaborative relations with partners


Our Footprint

As of 31st  March, 2014, OVL has a presence in 33 projects in 16 countries:

Myanmar | Russia | Vietnam | Iran |
Iraq | Syria | Libya | Sudan and South Sudan | Brazil | Colombia | Venezuela | Kazakhstan | Azerbaijan | Bangladesh |

Board Of Directors
The Chairman & Managing Director of ONGC - the parent company - is also the Chairman of ONGC Videsh. The ONGC Videsh Board consists of four full time Directors: the Managing Director, who is the Chief Executive Officer of the Company, Director (Finance), Director (Operations) and Director (Exploration). All whole-time Directors of ONGC are special invitees on the Board of ONGC Videsh.

Shri P.K.Singh, Joint Secretary (IC), Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, Government of India and Ms. Sharmila Chavaly, Joint Secretary,Department of Economic Affairs, Ministry of Finance, Government of India are part-time Directors on the ONGC Videsh Board.



 
D K Sarraf
Chairman
   

 
Narendra K Verma
Managing Director
   
S P Garg
Director (Finance)

Anil Bhandari
Director (Exploration)

 
P K Rao
Director (Operations)

P K Singh
Director

 
Sharmila Chavaly
Director
 
Shyam Saran
Director
Prof. Sanjay G. Dhande
Director
 
Prof. Shyamal Roy
Director
 
A K Banerjee
Special Invitee
Director (Finance),
ONGC
 
 
 
 
Shashi Shanker
Special Invitee
Director (T&FS), ONGC

 
T K Sengupta
Special Invitee
Director(Offshore),ONGC
 
D D Misra
Special Invitee
Director (HR), ONGC
         

Executive Committee
The Executive Committee of ONGC Videsh Limited consists of Managing Director and three Functional Directors viz., Director (Exploration), Director (Finance) and Director (Operations). The Executive Committee manages the business of the Company under the overall supervision, control and guidance of the Board.


 
Narendra K Verma
Managing Director
   
S P Garg
Director (Finance)

Anil Bhandari
Director (Exploration)

 
P K Rao
Director (Operations)

HSE VISION:

To be a leader in pursuit & attainment of Health, Safety & Environment performance


HSE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE
:

No accident, no harm to people and promote environment protection


Health Safety and Enviornment


ONGC VIDESH HSE Management System and respective operating companies worldwide defines the principles by which we conduct our operations worldwide. Has a long-standing HSE commitment to the highest standards for the Health Safety of our employees, customers, and contractors as well as to the protection of the Environment in the communities in which we live and work. in the best interest of the company’s long–term success. Comprehensive, compulsory HSE guidelines define global standards and procedures to help us fulfill that commitment.


ONGC VIDESH POLICY STATEMENT ON HEALTH SAFETY & ENVIORNMENT

 



 

Occupational Health, Safety and Environment Management System (HSE MS) - OVL
TheHealth, Safety and Environment Management System guidelines have been prepared for OVL operationsrelevant to the activities of the E&P industry worldwide in line with internationally recognized standards OHSAS 18001:2007 for Occupational Health & Safety Management System and ISO 14001:2004 for Environment Management System. Being sufficiently generic, these guidelines will assist in the development and application of HSEManagement System in OVL Projects.

The Guidelines describe the main elements necessary to develop, implementand maintain an HSEManagement System. They do not lay down specific performancerequirements, but recommend that operating Project/ companies set policies and objectivestaking into account information about the significant hazards and environmentalaspectsof their operations.



Management System Model based on PDCA (Deming) Cycle.



Element No.

HSEMS Element

Addressing

Element 1 Leadership, HSE Policy and Continual Improvement Top-down commitment& Corporate intentions essential to the success & continual improvement of the system
Element 2 Hazard/ aspect identification, risk/ impact assessment & determining controls Planning
Establishing/ Planning the processes and objectives necessary to deliver results in accordance with the HSE Policy

Element 3

Legal & other requirements
Element 4 Objectives, targets and Programmes
Element 5 Resources, Roles, Responsibility, Accountability & Authority Implementation & Operation
Developmentand implementation of the processesplanned for effective HSE management system
Element 6 Competence, Training & Awareness
Element 7 Communication, Participation & Consultation
Element 8 Documentation&Control of documents
Element 9 Operational control
Element 10 Emergency Preparedness and Response
Element 11 Monitoring & measurement Checking& Corrective action
Performance monitoring andhow corrective action is to be taken whennecessary
Element 12 Incident investigation, Non-conformity, Corrective action & Preventive action
Element 13 Control of Records
Element 14 Internal Audits
Element 15 Management Review Review
Periodic assessment of system performance,effectiveness and fundamental suitability


Element 1: Leadership, HSE Policy and Continual Improvement


OVLManagementis committedto develop, operate, maintain and continually improve the HSEManagement system. Management ensures that this commitment is reflected in the HSE Policy and translated intonecessary resourcesfor actions to protect health, safety and theenvironment in the areas of operation.

HSE COMMITMENT
    • Management is committedto clearly defining HSE policy, HSE objectives, roles and responsibilities, by providing needed resources and by measuring, reviewing and continuously improving the HSE performance.
    • Management, by personal example, both on and off the job be a model for positive HSE behaviour and reinforce and reward positive behaviour.
    • Management is committed to assert itself for not only to ensure adherence to the applicable statutory rules and regulations, but to go beyond such benchmarks also.
    • Management is committed to maintain a “Safety Culture” that would reflect in all the activities it perform, with the active involvement of all the employees, contractors, stakeholders and also the community.
    • Everybody who works for OVL is committed towards HSE and is responsible to ensure that all HSE rules, standards and guidelines are followed to accomplish the task.
    • Adhering to the HSE guidelines is mandatory at all levels.

OUR BELIEF
    • All injuries, occupational illnesses and environmental damage are preventable.
    • HSE is fundamental to the conduct of our business.
    • Doing things in HSE way always enhances productivity,profitability and sustainability.
    • No work is so important that it cannot be done safely.
    • Employee involvement, feedback, and recognition arefundamental to HSE.
    • HSE behavior is doing the job right.
    • Workplace risk shall be reduced in the following priority:
    1. Elimination
    2. Substitution
    3. Engineering Controls
    4. Signage/ warning and/ or administrative controls
    5. Personal protective equipment
    • HSE is not just the job of a few specialists. It’s everyone’sresponsibility and everyone can make a difference.
    • Safety off the job is an important element of our overall safetyeffort.
    • Management is directly responsible for preventing injuries and occupational illnesses, protecting the environment for visibly andconsistently establishing HSE as a priority.
    • Employees and contractors are responsible andaccountable for their actions.
    • Employees and contractors have an obligation, withoutfear of reprisal, to notify management of apparent andimminent hazards and environmental aspects. Everyone has an obligation not topursue any work that is unsafe and they have the right toreceive timely and adequate responses.
    • People are the most critical element in the success of aHSE programme.

HSE POLICY

The OVL’s management has defined and documented the OVL HSE policy and ensured that it:

  • is relevant to its activities, products and services and their effects on HSE;
  • is implemented and maintained at all organisational levels;
  • is publicly available;
  • commits the company to meet or exceed all relevant regulatory andlegislative requirements;
  • commits the company to reduce the risks and hazards to health, safety and the environment of its activities, products and services to levels which are as low as reasonably practicable;
  • Provides for the setting of HSE objectives that commit the company to continuous efforts to improve HSE performance.

Element 2: Hazard andenvironmental aspect identification, OH&S risk and environmental impact assessment & determining controls

2.1Hazard andenvironmental aspect identification

OVLshall identifytheOH&S hazards and environmental aspects which may arise from its activities, products or services.


The identification includes consideration of:

  • Planning, construction and commissioning (i.e. asset acquisition,development and improvement activities).
  • Routine and non-routine operating conditions, including shut-down,maintenance and start-up.
  • Incidents and potential emergency situations, including those arisingfrom:
    • Product/material containment failures.
    • Structural failure.
    • Climatic, geophysical and other external natural events.
    • Sabotage and breaches of security.
    • Human factors including breakdowns in the HSEMS.
  • Decommissioning, abandonment, dismantling and disposal.
  • Potential hazards and effects associated with past activities.

Personnel at all organisational levels are appropriately involved inthe identification of hazards and environmental aspects.

2.2OH&S risk and environmental impact assessment

OH&S hazards and environmental aspects identified are evaluated (assessed) against screening criteria.

As any evaluation technique provides results whichthemselves may be subject to a range of uncertainties, formal risk evaluation techniques are used in conjunction with the judgementof experienced personnel.

Risk evaluation:
  • includes effects of activities, products and services;
  • address effects and risks arising from both human and hardwarefactors;
  • solicit input from personnel directly involved with the risk area;
  • be conducted by qualified and competent personnel;
  • be conducted according to appropriate and documented methods;
  • be updated at specified intervals.
Evaluation of health and safety risks and effects include, whereappropriate, consideration of:
  • Fire, explosion and blowout.
  • Impacts and collisions.
  • Drowning, asphyxiation and electrocution.
  • Chronic and acute exposure to chemical, physical and biological agents.
  • Ergonomic factors.
Evaluation of acute and chronic environmental effects include,where appropriate, consideration of:
  • Controlled and uncontrolled emissions of matter and energy to land,water and the atmosphere.
  • Generation and disposal of solid and other wastes.
  • Use of land, water, fuels and energy, and other natural resources.
  • Noise, odour, dust, vibration.
  • Effects on specific parts of the environment including ecosystems.
  • Effects on archaeological and cultural sites and artifacts, natural areas,parks and conservation areas.
OVL documents those hazards andenvironmental aspects identified as significant in relation to health,safety and the environment, outlining the additional measures in place/ planned to reducethem. Risk reduction measuresincludes, both those to prevent incidents (i.e. reducing the probabilityof occurrence) and to mitigatechronic and acute effects (i.e. reducingthe consequences).
OH&S hazards and environmental aspects, as applicableshall be reduced in the following priority:
    • Elimination
    • Substitution
    • Engineering Controls
    • Signage/ warning and/ or administrative controls
    • Personal protective equipment
In all cases consideration is given to reducing risk to a leveldeemed ‘as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP)’ reflecting amongst other factorslocal conditions and circumstances, the balance of cost and benefitsand the current state of scientific and technical knowledge.

Procedures are in place to:
  • Identify prevention and mitigation measures for particular activities,products and services which pose potential HSE risks.
  • Re-appraise activities to ensure that the measures proposed do reducerisks, or enable relevant objectives to be met.
  • Implement, document and communicate to key personnel interim andpermanent risk reduction measuresand monitor their effectiveness.
  • Develop relevant measures such as plans for emergency responseto recover from incidents and mitigate their effects.
  • Identify hazards arising from risk prevention and mitigation andrecovery measures.
  • Evaluate the tolerability of consequent risks and effects against thescreening criteria.
Risk Management is a continuous process and the basis of all the HSE elements. OVL proactively and regularly identifies the hazards & environmental aspects and assess the risks associated with our activities in addition to regulatory compliance. We take appropriate action to manage the risks and hence prevent or reduce the impact of potential incidents.

Element 3: Legal & other requirements

OVL maintains procedure to identify andrecord all the legal and other requirements of the operating country,applicableto the HSE aspects of its operations, products andservices and to ensure compliance with such requirements.

Evaluation of compliance to applicable legal & other requirement is being carried out at appropriate level on periodic basis.

The legal and other requirements are being updated as and when changes in the legal scenario occur or at specified periodic intervals.

Element 4: Objectives, targets and Programmes

The setting and periodic revision of objectives and targets for the continual improvement of the HSEManagement System underpins the company’scommitment to HSE.

OVL maintains procedure to establish HSEobjectives, targets and programmes at relevant levels.

Such objectives and targets shall be developed in the lightof:
  • HSE  policy
  • Results of hazard identification & risk assessment 
  • Results of environmental aspects identification & impact assessment
  • Legal and other requirements
  • Technological options
  • Financial, Operational & Business requirements
  • Previous performance
  • Audit findings
  • Information from employee consultations, reviews and improvement activities in the workplace
  • Views of interested parties
  • Past records of HSE non-conformities and incidents
  • The results of the Management Review

 They shall be quantified, wherever practicable, identifiedwith defined timescales, realistic and achievable.

A hierarchy of HSE objectives is thus formed, from company strategic objectives to organisational andmore detailed local objectives.


Element 5: Resources, Roles, Responsibility, Accountability & Authority

Successful handling of HSE matters is a line responsibility, requiring theactive participation of all levels of management, supervision and involvement of all employees.

OVLshall define, document and communicate, the roles, responsibilities,accountabilities, authorities and interrelations necessary to implement and continually improve theHSEManagement System.

The organisational structure and allocation of responsibilities shallreflect the responsibility of line managers at all levels for developing,implementing and maintaining the HSEManagement System in their particular areas.

Senior management shall allocate sufficient resources to ensure theeffective operation of the HSEManagement System, taking account of advice from the line management and HSE specialists.

Resource allocation shall be reviewed regularly as parts of the Reviewof the HSE management system.

Element 6: Competence, Training & Awareness

Competency and Behaviour is critical to operational success; therefore, our workforce is carefully selected and trained, and their skills and competencies regularly assessed as per following diagram




In addition to allocating responsibilities, level of competencyis determinedbased on personal abilities, skills, experience, formal qualification and training—necessary to ensure the capabilityof personnel to carry out HSE-critical functions. Activities and roles whichaffect the HSE performance shall be included in job descriptions andconsidered for performance appraisals.

Training—including refresher courses—helps ensure that:
  • All personnel can make an appropriate contribution to good HSEperformance.
  • New recruitsand staff assigned to new tasks, equipment andprocedures, understand their roles and responsibilities for HSEmatters.
Managers understand the HSEManagement System, have the necessary knowledgetoplay their part in it, and appreciate the criteria by which itseffectiveness will be judged.

Element 7: Communication, Participation & Consultation

OVL shall actively engage in dialog with stakeholders, as shown below to receive public feedback, maintain public confidence in the integrity of its operations, and to communicate our Commitment to HSE performance.


Effective communication with stakeholders requires careful consideration of the message tobe transmitted—or the information to be sought—and to the most appropriatemedium for doing so.

Effective two-way communication on HSE issues, including awareness programmesand campaigns directed towards specific HSE concernswithemployees and contractors areimportant for HSE performance.

The need to communicate in an appropriate language and style is very important for OVL, as its operating in many countries having different languages & cultures. HSEprocedures and instructions need to be in a language and style that is understoodby site personnel. Communication must be tested regularly.

Community awareness, consultation programmes and responding to legitimate community concerns about the HSE effects offacilities shall be taken care off.

Element 8: Documentation & Control of documents

The primary purpose of the documentation is to provide an adequatedescription of the HSEMS, and to serve as a permanent reference to theimplementation and maintenance of that system. Documentation may be inpaper, electronic, or other format, but it is important to ensure consistency inapproach and content, and in control, review and amendment of procedures.

Proper documentation enhances HSE management efficiency through:
  • Channeling information efficiently to where it is used and needed by staff.
  • Aiding awareness of responsibilities and correct task performance.
  • Avoiding information-dependency on individuals.
  • Reducing learning time on new tasks.
  • Demonstrating the existence of systems and practices.
In determining the degree of detail of HSEManagement System documentation, considerationshall be given that it is fit for its purpose, given the complexity of operations, nature of thehazards and risks and environmental aspects involved.

The company shall maintain procedures for controlling HSE management system documentsto ensure that:
    • they can be readily identified with the appropriate company, division, functionor activity;
    • they are periodically reviewed, revised as necessary and approved foradequacy by authorised personnel prior to issue;
    • current versions are available at those locations where they areneeded;
    • when obsolete, they are promptly removed from all points of issue andpoints of use.

Element 9: Operational control

As a follow-up to risk and aspect evaluation, OVL shall maintainprocedures, wherever necessary to set performance criteria for HSE-critical activities and tasks,which stipulate the acceptable standard for their performance. Itshall also, at specified intervals, review the continuing relevance andsuitability of the criteria.

Operational control can take manyforms, documented or not, depending on the complexity of the task, the competence of thepeople performing it, the inherent hazards and aspects associated with it, andthe effects that it might have on other operation or facility.

Verbal instructions or undocumented procedures will need to be supported with, or replaced by,written work instructions wherever the absence of written material couldprejudice HSE performance. Key operating parameters are established and regularly monitored. The workforce understands their roles and responsibilities to maintain operations within these parameters.

All temporary and permanent changes to organization, personnel, systems, procedures, equipment, products, materials or substances will be evaluated and managed (Management of change) to ensure that health, safety and environmental risks/ aspects arising from these changes remain at an acceptable level.

Contractors and suppliers are key to our HSE performance.OVL shall assess their capabilities and competencies to perform work on our behalf. We shall work together with them to ensure that our HSE expectations are aligned through bridging documents.

Management shall ensure that clearly defined start-up, operating, maintenance and shutdown procedures are in place with designated authorities.Risks introduced by simultaneous operations are assessed and managed.Inspection and testing of all equipment post maintenance or modification shall be carried out as per procedure prior to use.

OVL shall maintain procedure to ensure that HSEcritical equipmentsare identified with required performance criteria. They are designed, constructed/ procured accordingly and operated, maintained and inspected for the required purpose complyingwith Health, Safety and Environmental Management System including management of temporary disarming or deactivation (By pass).

Comprehensive waste management programmes shall ensure that wastes are minimised, re-used, recycled, or properly disposed off.HSE impacts associated with waste, emissions, noise, impact on biodiversity and energy use are monitored and minimized with operational control procedures.

Decommissioning, remediation and restoration plans are established using risk/ impact-based studies for end of life equipment/ facilities.

Element 9: Operational control

As a follow-up to risk and aspect evaluation, OVL shall maintainprocedures, wherever necessary to set performance criteria for HSE-critical activities and tasks,which stipulate the acceptable standard for their performance. Itshall also, at specified intervals, review the continuing relevance andsuitability of the criteria.

Operational control can take manyforms, documented or not, depending on the complexity of the task, the competence of thepeople performing it, the inherent hazards and aspects associated with it, andthe effects that it might have on other operation or facility.

Verbal instructions or undocumented procedures will need to be supported with, or replaced by,written work instructions wherever the absence of written material couldprejudice HSE performance. Key operating parameters are established and regularly monitored. The workforce understands their roles and responsibilities to maintain operations within these parameters.

All temporary and permanent changes to organization, personnel, systems, procedures, equipment, products, materials or substances will be evaluated and managed (Management of change) to ensure that health, safety and environmental risks/ aspects arising from these changes remain at an acceptable level.

Contractors and suppliers are key to our HSE performance.OVL shall assess their capabilities and competencies to perform work on our behalf. We shall work together with them to ensure that our HSE expectations are aligned through bridging documents.

Management shall ensure that clearly defined start-up, operating, maintenance and shutdown procedures are in place with designated authorities.Risks introduced by simultaneous operations are assessed and managed.Inspection and testing of all equipment post maintenance or modification shall be carried out as per procedure prior to use.

OVL shall maintain procedure to ensure that HSEcritical equipmentsare identified with required performance criteria. They are designed, constructed/ procured accordingly and operated, maintained and inspected for the required purpose complyingwith Health, Safety and Environmental Management System including management of temporary disarming or deactivation (By pass).
Comprehensive waste management programmes shall ensure that wastes are minimised, re-used, recycled, or properly disposed off.HSE impacts associated with waste, emissions, noise, impact on biodiversity and energy use are monitored and minimized with operational control procedures.

Decommissioning, remediation and restoration plans are established using risk/ impact-based studies for end of life equipment/ facilities.


Element 10: Emergency Preparedness and Response

Emergency management plans shall be maintained based on the HSE risks& aspects assessmentto cover all of our facilities, locations and products. These plans shall identify equipment, training and personnel necessary to protect the workforce, facility, equipment, public, environment and OVL’s reputation in the event of an incident.

Mock drills and exercises shall be conducted to assess and improve emergency response/crisis management capabilities, including liaison with and involvement of external organizations.

Lessons learned from previous incidents, drills and exercises shall be used to periodically update Emergency plans and imparting training to personnel foremergency management.

The emergency plans shall:
    • beclearly communicated;
    • bewell-rehearsed;
    • co-ordinate internal and external emergency response teams;
    • pay particular attention to external communication;
    • include provision for the reporting and investigation of incidents;
    • take account of the environmental effects of measures taken to manageescalating emergency situations.

Element 11: Monitoring & measurement and Evaluation of compliance

OVL shall identify in line with HSE policy, objectives, legal and other requirements, the key characteristics of operations and activities that can have impact on the HSE performance.OVL shall maintain procedures for monitoring and measurement ofthese key characteristics on a regular basis to ensure compliance with objectives and overall HSE performance. For each relevant activity or area, OVL shall define procedures for:
  • identifying and documenting the monitoring information to be obtained, both qualitative and quantitative, appropriate to the needs
  • monitoring of the objectives & programmes
  • monitoring the effectiveness of operational controls
  • monitoring non-conformities and incidents
  • data handling and interpretation sufficient to facilitate subsequent corrective action and preventative action analysis.
  • actions to be taken when results breach performance criteria
  • validity of affected data when monitoring systems are found to be malfunctioning;
  • safeguarding measurement systems from unauthorised adjustments or damage.
Monitoring and measuring equipment shall be used in a manner that ensures that the measurement uncertainty is known and is consistent with the required monitoring and measuring requirements. This shall be done through periodic calibration of all the critical monitoring & measurement equipment and taking note of the errors if any. Record of calibration is maintained. 

OVL shall periodically assess the implementation of and compliance with these expectations to assure ourselves and stakeholders that management processes are in place and working effectively. This shall involve both internal self-assessmentsand appropriate external assessments. OVL shall use this information to improve HSEperformance and processes. The compliance of legal and other requirements shall be evaluated periodically. Any delay in compliance to a specific requirement shall be brought out by line manager.

Element 12: Incident investigation, Non-conformity, Corrective action & Preventive action

OVLshall maintain procedures for the recording, reporting,investigating and analysingof incidents which affected (accidents), or could have affected (near misses) HSEperformance, so as to prevent recurrenceand improve our performance.

In addition, non-conformities (non-fulfillment of a requirement) shall be identified by the monitoring programme,through communication from employees, contractors, customers,government agencies or the public, or from investigation of incidents.

OVLshall define the responsibility and authority for initiatinginvestigation and corrective action in the event of incident/ non-conformity relating to the HSEManagement Systemappropriateto the severity of its real or potential consequences.

The size and composition of the investigating team will depend on the severity (real/ potential)of incident/ non-conformity. The team members selected shall be properly trainedto carry out the task objectively, impartially and effectively. Internal investigation may be conducted parallel to the externalinvestigation by the authorities.

The investigation process comprises the following basic steps:
  • Review of the incident site andcircumstances, interview of witnesses, analysis of operatingconditions, data and other evidences.
  • Determine underlying deficiencies (root cause) and other factors that might be causing or contributing to the occurrence of incident(s);
  • Identifyremedial actions to minimise the chance of recurrence.
  • Identify opportunities for continual improvement;
  • Provide a factual record of the circumstances of the incident.
  • Preparation and issue of investigation report.
Such investigation will enable planning of suitable corrective and preventive actions to prevent recurrence and occurrence across OVL operations. Documentation and procedures shall be revised accordingly for effective implementation as shown in the diagram below.

All Corrective action & Preventive action shall be verified periodically by line mangers for effectiveness in preventing recurrence/ occurrence & would also be verified for the effectiveness in the internal audits. 




Element 13: Control of Records

The company shall maintain a system of records in order to demonstratethe extent of compliance with its HSE policy and its requirements, and torecord the extent to which planned objectives and performance criteriahave been met.

Procedures shall be maintained to ensure the integrity, accessibility andcontrol of such records.  The retention times of records and disposal of old records shall be established and recorded.

Relevant records compiled under other parts of the overall managementsystem need not be duplicated, but means of access to them for data retrieval is to bespecified.

Records shall include, but not limited to:
    • Reports of audits and follow-up actions
    • Management review meetings and follow-up actions
    • Evaluation of compliance to legislative, regulatory & other requirements
    • Any incidents and follow-up actions
    • Any complaints and follow-up actions
    • Record of non-conformity
    • Results of corrective action
    • Results of preventive actionInspection and maintenance reports
    • Calibration and verification of monitoring &measuring equipment
    • Measurement and Monitoring record
    • Training records.

Element 14: Internal Audit

The company shall maintain procedures for internal audits to be carried out on periodic basis, as anormal part of business control, in order to determine:
  • Whether HSE management system elements and activities conform to planned arrangements and are implemented effectively.
  • The effective functioning of the HSEManagement System in fulfilling the company’s HSEpolicy, objectives and targets.
  • Compliance with relevant legislative & other requirements.
  • Identification of areas for improvement, leading to progressively betterHSE management.
For this purpose, it shall maintain an audit plan, dealing with
    • Specific activities and areas to be audited.
    • Frequency of auditing specific activities/areas.
    • Allocation of resources including auditors to the auditing process ensuring that the audit team has:
    • adequate independence from activities audited to enable objectiveand impartial judgement;
    • broad knowledge of HSE matters and experiencein auditing practices
    • the necessary expertise in relevant disciplines;
    • support, if necessary, from a wider range of specialists.
    • Methodologies for conducting and documenting the audits, which mayinvolve the use of questionnaires, checklists, interviews, measurementsand direct observations, depending on the nature of the function beingaudited.
    • Procedures for reporting audit findings. Reporting shall address:
    • conformity or nonconformity of the HSEMS elements with specifiedrequirements;
    • effectiveness of the implemented HSEMS in enabling objectivesand performance criteria to be met;
    • implementation and effectiveness of corrective actions fromprevious audits;
    • conclusions and recommendations.

Element 15: Management Review

The company’s senior management shall, at appropriate intervalsreview the HSEManagement System and its performance, to ensure its continuing suitabilityand effectiveness.


The review shall address, but not limited to:
  • The possible need for changes to the policy, objectives and HSE Management System, in the lightof changing circumstances and the commitment to strive for continualimprovement
  • Resource allocation for HSEManagement System implementation and maintenance
  • HSE audit results
  • Evaluation of compliance with applicable legal & other requirements
  • HSE performance
  • Incident investigations, status of corrective/ preventive actions
The review process shall be documented, and its results recorded, tofacilitate implementation of consequent changes.

Corporate Social Responsibility

OVL, operating overseas, understands its responsibility to contribute to the communities and economies of the countries in which it operates. OVL is committed to create a positive and lasting social impact by developing successful partnerships built on mutual trust and respect, ultimately, raising the standard of living and the stability of the communities of the countries in which it operates. OVL makes valuable contributions in many ways: through payment of tax revenues to governments; by investing in education and training and improving employment opportunities for nationals; providing medical/sports/agricultural facilities to the local communities, etc. During 2007-08, OVL had also contributed USD 100,000 to the relief fund of the local authorities of Sakhalin, Russia to support relief efforts for victims of the devastating earthquakes in Nevelsk. Further, with the objective to ensure access by every citizen to information under the control of the Company and in order to bring in transparency and accountability, an appropriate mechanism has been set up at OVL's corporate office in New Delhi in the line with the requirements of Right to Information Act, 2005.
 

Careers
OVL does not recruit independently for any position within the organisation. As a policy decision, all recruitments are through our parent company, ONGC, which releases the relevant advertisements from time to time on its website. For more information, please visit www.ongcindia.com.
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